The research I conduct with my research team falls into 3 main research streams.

Research Team

Thomas Perrino

Thomas Perrino is a master’s student in law (Ll.M.) at the University of Ottawa. He is a graduate of the Civil Law Section (LL.L. 2016) and the École du Barreau du Québec. A specialist in insurance law, Thomas previously worked for the Quebec Insurance Brokerage Association and currently sits on the board of directors of the Association de la relève en assurance du Québec – Montérégie. His master’s thesis focuses on the interpretation of liability insurance contracts.

Thomas joined the team in the summer of 2016. Thomas was in charge of conducting interviews with notaries  in the course of the research project on the notarial profession in the Outaouais region. He is currently working on consumer dispute resolution in Québec.

Alexandre Petterson

Alexandre Petterson is a student in the Canadian Law (J.D./LL.L) program at the University of Ottawa and a graduate of the Université de Montréal in Political Science (B.Sc.).

Alexandre joined the team in the fall of 2016. He first worked on the survey conducted as part of the project on the notarial profession in Outaouais and he is currently investigating issues related to the feminization of the notarial profession.

Charlotte Dahin

Charlotte Dahin is a PhD student in Feminist and Gender Studies at the University of Ottawa. She holds a law degree from the Catholic University of Louvain in Belgium and a Master’s degree in international law from the University of Aberdeen in the United Kingdom (LL.M.). Her research focuses on the experience and rights of women in the refugee determination process.

Charlotte joined the team in the fall of 2017. She is working on the research project on the feminization of the notarial profession in Quebec.

Danielle Lussier-Meek

Danielle Lussier-Meek (Ll.L., Ll.B., Ll.M.) is a Métis from the Red River and a doctoral student at the Faculty of Law at the University of Ottawa. A former clerk of the Federal Court of Canada, she previously worked for the Canadian Bar Association, the Library of Parliament and the Canadian International Trade Tribunal. She has been a member of the Ontario Bar since 2009.

Danielle is particularly interested in Aboriginal legal theories, the strategies used by Aboriginal lawyers in the practice of Canadian law and feminist legal theory, including the intersectional analysis of the Canadian colonial experience. She is working on the research project on professionalism among Canadian lawyers.

access_time Content updated 2018-04-02.